Author Archives: Shana.Harris

Drug Panels at 2019 AAAs

We are one week away from the 2020 American Anthropological Association annual conference in Vancouver, Canada!

There are several panels, papers, posters, and events about alcohol, drugs, tobacco, and related topics!  Below is a list of presentations and activities that will be of interest to ADTSG members, many of which involve our members.  And don’t forget to come to the ADTSG Business Meeting on Friday, November 22, at 12:15pm in Convention Center West Room 111!  All are welcome!

Wednesday, November 20

12:00pm – 1:45pm (Convention Center West Room 114)

  • PAPER: The Discourse of Craft and the Production of Value: Studying the Craft Beer Community (Presenter: Wesley Shumar)

12:00pm – 1:45pm (Convention Center West Room 101 & 102)

  • PAPER: Effects of Cannabidiol (CBD) and Sociocultural Environment on Product Use Behavior and Health (Presenter: Whitney Cotten)

2:15pm – 4:00pm (Convention Center West Room 217)

  • PAPER: A Toast to Adulthood: College Students’ Guide to Merrymaking in Postreform China (Presenter: Chun-Yi Sum)

2:15pm – 4:00pm (Convention Center West Ballroom A)

  • PAPER: Mothering in the Shadows: How Opiate Addicted Women Care for Their Children (Presenter: Kelley Kampman)

2:15pm – 4:00pm (Convention Center West Room 112)

  • PAPER: Weed and Waiting: Raising Consciousness as Survival Practice in Afro-Caribbean Costa Rica (Presenter: Sabia McCoy-Torres)

2:15pm – 4:00pm (Convention Center West Room 103 & 104)

  • PAPER: Paths of Potentiality: Violence, Media, and Affective Indeterminacies in Mexico’s “Drug War” (Presenters: Agnes Mondragon Celis Ochoa)

2:15pm – 4:00pm (Convention Center West Room 110)

  • PAPER: Precarity of Motherhood in Opioid Recovery: Making It to the Methadone Clinic as a Demonstration of Commitment to Parenthood (Presenter: Emery Eaves)

4:30pm – 6:15pm (Convention Center West Room 212)

  • PAPER: What Explains the Paradox of “Black Neighborhood Liquor Stores”? (Presenter: Juliet Lee)

4:30pm – 6:15pm (Convention Center West Ballroom B)

  • PAPER: A Trip to Save a Life: Psychedelics and the Untraveled Road Toward Addiction Recovery  (Presenter: Jessica Cadoch)

Thursday, November 21

8:00am – 9:45am (Convention Center West Room 301)

  • PAPER: Home and Weapon: Care and the Politics of Veteran Drunk Driving (Presenter: Ken MacLeish)

8:00am – 9:45am (Convention Center West Room 213)

  • PAPER: Decolonizing Our Conceptual Heritage Through Psychedelics (Presenter: Joshua Falcon)

10:15am – 12:00pm (Convention Center West Room 208)

  • ROUNDTABLE: Fat Talk, Lighting Up, and Consuming Identities: Reflecting on the Contributions of Mimi Nichter

10:15am – 12:00pm (Convention Center West Room 216)

  • PAPER: Drinking Embodied: Gift, Commodity, and the Construction of Transnational Japanese Identity in Honolulu (Presenter: Christopher Chapman)

10:15am – 12:00pm (Convention Center West Room 112)

  • PAPER: What We Thought They Understood: Longitudinal Marihuana Research and Its Consequences (Presenter: J. Bryan Page)

10:15am – 12:00pm (Convention Center West Room 201)

  • PAPER: The Wolf at the Door: Human-Alcohol Collaborations in Craft Brewing (Presenter: Aaron Delgaty)

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Ballroom B)

  • ROUNDTABLE: Drug War Correspondents: Struggle, Collaboration, and Justice on the Frontlines of the Overdose Epidemic

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Room 214)

  • PAPER: The Loosened Ties That Bind: Work, Alcohol, and Korean Television (Presenter: William Silcott)

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Ballroom Lobby)

  • POSTER: When the Right is Wrong: The Cultural Construction of Evidence in Ontario’s Harm Reduction Policies (Presenter: Stephanie Arlt)

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 105)

  • PAPER: Necrosecurity: Youthful Navigations in the Monster City (Presenter: Brenda Garcia)

Friday, November 22

8:00 am – 9:45 am (Convention Center West Room 219)

  • PANEL: Recovering, Rehabilitated, Healthy: Critical Anthropological Perspectives on Addiction Treatment Buzzwords

8:00am – 9:45am (Convention Center West Room 112)

  • PAPER: The Penetrating Gaze of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Intimate Revelations and Constructions of Indigenous Life in Canada (Presenter: Leslie Sabiston)

10:15am – 12:00pm (Convention Center West Room 110)

  • PAPER: Caring for the Self By Escaping the Self: The Temporality of Opioid Addiction in Rural Appalachia (Presenter: Joshua Burraway)

10:15am – 12:00pm (Convention Center East Room 7)

  • PAPER: “We Will Get Them Addicted” and “Yes, I’m a Sex Worker”: Stigma, Identity, and Strategy in an Unstable NGO-Donor Landscape (Presenter: Ayaz Qureshi)

12:15pm – 1:45pm (Convention Center West Room 111)

  • ADTSG Open Business Meeting

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Room 209)

  • PAPER: “Keeping a Fear in Your Pocket”: Affective Strategies of Long-Term Abstainers (Presenter: Matthew Pettit)

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Room 206)

  • PAPER: Austerity, Gallows Humor, and the Contradictions of Recovery Capital in the English Health and Social Care System (Presenter: Maxfield Waterman)

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 115)

  • PAPER: Envisioning Recovery at the Intersection of Mental Illness, Substance Use, and Homelessness in Rural New England: Personal and Community Trajectories of Possibility (Presenter: Elizabeth Carpenter-Song)

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 115)

  • PAPER: Reality on the Horizon: Women’s Conceptualizations of Their Future Before and After Leaving an Inpatient Drug Rehabilitation Center (Presenter: Ellen Kozelka)

Saturday, November 23

8:00am – 9:45am (Convention Center East Room 15)

  • PAPER: Healing the Addict: Ethics, Discipline, and Control in Kurdish Istanbul (Presenter: Onur Gunay)

8:00am – 9:45am (Convention Center West Room 219)

  • PAPER: heART Space: Curating Community Grief from Overdose (Presenter: Jennifer Robinson)

8:00am – 9:45am (Convention Center West Room 217)

PAPER: Gendered Violence and Overdose Risk in Low-income Housing: An Ethnographic Study of Housing-Based Overdose Prevention Site Utilization in Vancouver, Canada (Presenter: Alexandra Collins)

10:15am – 12:00pm (Convention Center West Room 301)

PAPER: Child Welfare in Western Wisconsin: Methamphetamine “Crisis” and the Punitive Regulation of Families (Presenter: Tina Lee)

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Room 118)

PANEL: Whiteness and Its Factures in the U.S. Opioid “Crisis”

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Ballroom Lobby)

  • POSTER: Y.A. in A.A.: Alcohols Who Entered the Program of Alcoholics Anonymous Under the Age of 25 (Presenter: Connie Ticho)

2:00pm – 3:45pm (Convention Center West Room 109)

  • PAPER: Organizational Cultural Themes of the Native American Church From Establishment in 1918 to an International Organization Representing U.S. and Canadian Peyotists in 1957 (Presenter: Dennis Wiedman)

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 203)

  • PAPER: How Anthropological Problems Differ and Repeat Across Generations (Presenter: Bhrigupati Singh)

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 101 & 102)

  • PANEL: Anthropologists at the Frontlines of the Opioid Epidemic: Changing the Climate of Care and Policy Throughout Canada and the United States

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 302 & 303)

  • PAPER: Implementation Contexts and the Impact of the Built Environment on Access to Supervised Consumption Services in Toronto, Canada (Presenter: Geoff Bardwell)

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 302 & 303)

  • PAPER: Police Practices in Relation to Supervised Injection Site Users in Vancouver: An Ethnographic Study (Presenter: Benjamin Scher)

4:15pm – 6:00pm (Convention Center West Room 302 & 303)

  • Women Who Use Illicit Drugs: Experiences of Structural Violence in the Context of Overlapping Syndemics of Gendered Violence and Overdose Death (Presenter: Jade Boyd)

Reminder – ADTSG Membership Drive

The Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA) supports Special Interest Groups (SIGs) as an important part of strengthening communication and collaboration among scholars based on topical interests. As a SIG of the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA), the Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco Study Group (ADTSG) reports our membership demographics to the SMA board, which helps them determine SIG status and resource allocation.

The form is available now through November 10, 2019.  The form is very brief; it only takes 1-2 minutes to fill out! It will be used to establish memberships in all the SIGs. We ask that all ADTSG members who would like to be part of this or other SIGs fill out this form whether you are currently a member or not.

Please note: You do NOT need to be a member of SMA or AAA to continue your membership in ADTSG. Simply indicate on the form whether you are a member of SMA/AAA or not and select the appropriate SIG(s) in which you would like to maintain membership.

The form is available at: https://forms.gle/ADJeTMayHFF46L5A7

You will only need to fill out this form once per year. Please direct any questions/comments to Elizabeth Wirtz: wirtz@purdue.edu .

 

CFP – “Ontopolitics” of Drugs and Drug Policies

 

Call for Papers – Special Section of the International Journal of Drug Policy

The “Ontopolitics” of Drugs and Drug Policies

Guest Editors: Cameron Duff and Tim Rhodes

There are shifts within the field of drugs research and drug policy towards investigating evidence and intervention as matters of ontology. This encourages an approach to evidence, and what counts as evidence, in discussions of drugs and drug policy that moves beyond mere methodological and epistemological concerns to consider how various knowledge-making practices bring drugs and drug policies into being. The focus is on how evidence and intervention are performed in relation to material practices, of which research and science are part. Such practice-oriented approaches have challenged presumptions of separation between the material and the social, nature and society, and evidence and practice, instead envisaging these entangled as effects of ‘actor-networks’ (Latour, 2005; Law, 2009; Michael, 2017) and ‘assemblages’ (Duff, 2014; Delanda, 2016; Andrews and Duff, 2019). There is a growing track record within the field of drugs research and drug policy which investigates how drug-related realities are not fixed and stable but emergent and contingent, that is, made-up in situated material practices (for example: Gomart, 2002; Malins, 2004; Fraser and Moore, 2011; Fraser, Moore and Keane, 2014; Moore and Fraser, 2013; Duff, 2014; Dennis, 2019; Lancaster, 2016; Vitellone, 2017; Race, 2018; Rhodes, 2018; Rhodes and Lancaster, 2019; Rhodes et al., 2019). This journal has contributed to this body of work (for example: Fraser, 2013, 2017; Dilkes-Frayne et al., 2017; Dennis, 2017; Malins, 2017; Hart, 2018; Duff, 2011, 2016, 2018; Rhodes et al., 2016).

Importantly, a turn towards ontologically oriented approaches concentrates attention on the ontopolitical effects of drugs, drug policies and drugs research. If the realities of drugs and drug-related interventions are situated in material practices, then they are also open to being done differently. In an ontological approach to research, we can consider how evidence and intervention constitutes realities in particular ways, with particular social and material effects. These are ontopolitical questions which invite us to ask of research not only how knowledge is performed but also what the political effects of different knowledge enactments might be (Mol, 1999, 2002).

With these themes in mind, we invite contributions for a cluster of papers on the ontopolitics of drugs research and drug policy. We are interested in exploring how realities are constituted through the knowledge-making practices of drugs research and intervention, and how drugs research might proceed when viewed as an ontological concern. We are interested in the following types of papers: review; commentary; original research; and short responses.

Full papers should be submitted to the journal by December 1, 2019.

When submitting, please indicate that your paper is for consideration as part of the special section on ‘ontopolitics’ from the drop-down menu under ‘article type’.

All manuscripts will be subject to the usual peer review process.

 

Annual ADTSG Membership Drive

 

The Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA) supports Special Interest Groups (SIGs) as an important part of strengthening communication and collaboration among scholars based on topical interests. As a SIG of the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA), the Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco Study Group (ADTSG) reports our membership demographics to the SMA board, which helps them determine SIG status and resource allocation.

The form is available now through November 10, 2019.  The form is very brief; it only takes 1-2 minutes to fill out! It will be used to establish memberships in all the SIGs. We ask that all ADTSG members who would like to be part of this or other SIGs fill out this form whether you are currently a member or not.

Please note: You do NOT need to be a member of SMA or AAA to continue your membership in ADTSG. Simply indicate on the form whether you are a member of SMA/AAA or not and select the appropriate SIG(s) in which you would like to maintain membership.

The form is available at: https://forms.gle/ADJeTMayHFF46L5A7

You will only need to fill out this form once per year. Please direct any questions/comments to Elizabeth Wirtz: wirtz@purdue.edu .

Student Profile: Ben Scher

Here is the latest installment of ADTSG’s student profiles feature!

These profiles are a way for the ADTSG membership to become acquainted with the next generation of anthropologists of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco.  In this vein, each profile will introduce one graduate or undergraduate student to the group by asking him or her a series of questions related to his/her background and career aspirations in this field.

In this installment, we are profiling Ben Scher, a M.A. student from the University of Waterloo.

Why did you choose to study anthropology?

Whilst anthropology was not offered at my high school, I was always passionate about history, politics, and human geography. Once I began my undergraduate degree at Durham University in the UK, I was immediately captured by anthropology’s ability to include these elements of the human story into one discipline. Having majored in anthropology and philosophy, when it came time to choose which discipline I wanted to write my thesis on, conducting hands-on research through the form of ethnography was extremely appealing. Getting this opportunity in my undergraduate degree motivated me to continue my studies and pursue an M.A.

Why are you interested in alcohol, drugs, and tobacco research?

Mind-altering substances, illicit or not, have been and will continue to be present in human societies, regardless of what conservative politicians try and enact through the “War on Drugs.” Thus, it is imperative that the research community is at the center of understanding how the presence of substances can be managed in the safest and most logical way possible. In producing research, credible evidence can drive progressive, evidence-based policies. In light of the current opioid epidemic in North America, I am passionate about conducting research evaluating both the benefits of supervised consumption sites and the legislation needed in order to implement them into communities in need.

What are your research plans for studying alcohol, drugs, and tobacco?

For my M.A. research, this past summer I completed 5 months of ethnographic fieldwork at one of the supervised consumption sites in Vancouver. The purpose of this research is to analyze the ways in which police impact the daily lives of supervised consumption site users and ultimately inform on police practices that best serve the community in need of this service. Whilst in the last decade, police practices in the city have been updated to better address the increase in overdose rates, the findings of this study suggest that years of police harassment and subsequent distrust of this community still renders perceived police presence to be a barrier to everyday harm reduction practices sought out by illicit substance users. Ultimately the aim of this study is to contribute towards the body of literature uncovering the unintended structural violence produced by policing and shed light on potential solutions.

What do you hope to do after you graduate?

I am currently in the process of applying for Ph.D. programs in both the fields of social policy and anthropology. The aim of my doctoral research is to continue to conduct research on supervised consumption sites with the hope of producing research that can aid in the implementation of progressive public policy surrounding drug use and in particular aiding in solutions to the current overdose rates in North America.

If you are an anthropology student and would like to be profiled for the ADTSG website, please contact ADTSG’s Student Liaison, Breanne Casper, at casperb@mail.usf.edu for more information!

Graduate Student Paper Prize Winner: Sarah Brothers

The Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco Study Group is happy to announce the winner of our 2019 Graduate Student Paper Prize: Sarah Brothers!

Sarah is currently a Ph.D. student at Yale University. Her award-winning paper, A Good “Doctor” is Hard to Find: Assessing Uncredentialed Expertise in Assisted Injection, examines how laypeople assess uncredentialed expertise in the high-risk practice of assisted injection (when one person injects another with illicit drugs) in San Francisco, California.

The ADTSG Graduate Student Paper Prize is an annual award that recognizes the best graduate student paper in the anthropology of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, or other psychoactive substance use. Please join us in congratulating Sarah on her excellent work and contribution to our field!

Graduate Student Travel Award Winner: Breanne Casper

The Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco Study Group is happy to announce the winner of our 2019 Graduate Student Travel Award: Breanne Casper!

Bree is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida.  The paper she will be presenting at the AAAs in Vancouver, Unscripted Change: A Critical Analysis of Rehabilitation Rhetoric in “Natural Recovery,” will examine academic, expert, and cultural constructions of “addiction” and “recovery” to interrogate the rhetoric and practice of drug cessation through “natural recovery.”

The ADTSG Graduate Student Travel Award is an annual award that helps a graduate student attend the AAAs to present a paper that engages questions related to alcohol, drugs, tobacco, or other psychoactive substance use.  Please join us in congratulating Bree on his excellent contribution to our field!

Contemporary Drug Problems Conference – Prato 2019

Rethinking “Change”: New Theories, New Topics, New Questions, New Methods

5th Contemporary Drug Problems Conference

This is a reminder that the 5th Contemporary Drug Problems Conference will soon convene in Prato, Italy, from September 4-6, 2019.  The conference will critically explore and debate the issues posed when we re-imagine the notion and focus of ‘change’ in relation to drugs.

Confirmed keynote speakers are:

  • Fay Dennis, ECR keynote, Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London: “Mobilising Stasis: A Critical Orientation to Change”
  • Natasha Martin, Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego: “Rethinking Hepatitis C Treatment and Prevention: How Modelling Is Informing the Change Required To Achieve Elimination among People Who Inject Drugs”
  • Kate Seear, Faculty of Law, Monash University: “On Law’s Fragility, Onto-advocacy and the Possibility of Change”

Further details on the conference theme, keynote and accepted presentations, venue, format, and registration are available at: http://ndri.curtin.edu.au/news-events/ndri-events/fifth-contemporary-drug-problems-conference.  A draft program will be posted in the coming weeks.  Please consider attending!

CFP: Society for Medical Anthropology 2020 Conference

2020 Conference of the Society for Medical Anthropology in Havana, Cuba

The Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA) will hold its 3rd conference in Havana, Cuba, on March 9-12, 2020. It will take place during Anthropos 2020, the anthropology conference organized by the University of Havana. The conference registration and welcome will take place on Monday, March 9th, and they will devote each of the following three days to one topic: 1) social determination of health from social medicine, critical epidemiology, and critical medical anthropology perspective, 2) sexual and reproductive health and rights, and 3) indigenous movements and intercultural care in health.

The SMA hopes to have participation from medical anthropologists from around the world and that, by holding the meeting in Cuba, many will come from other Latin American countries that have been highly productive intellectually in these three areas. All the sessions will have translation services Spanish-English. Travel to Cuba to attend conferences is permitted, and since commercial flights from the United States were allowed two years ago, the cost of traveling to Havana has decreased substantially. The SMA is currently working on securing affordable single and shared rooms and will provide more information as it becomes available.

Presentation of Abstracts

Only one abstract is permitted as first author. Abstracts should adhere to the following format: title (in capital letters, centered, and limited to 20 words), author(s) with the name of the presenter underlined, institution(s), email address, country, preference of audio or poster presentation, reference to medical anthropology as the proposed thematic area, and any required audiovisual media. Each abstract should be no more than 250 words, in 12-point Arial font, single-spaced, written in Word version 6.0 or higher, and should include: introduction, objectives, methods, results, and conclusions. Submissions should not contain citations or bibliographical references. Please submit the abstract to anthroposmontane2020@gmail.com.

Submission deadline: October 12, 2019.

If accepted, you will receive notification by October 28, 2019.

Publication of Congress Contributions

The abstracts or papers submitted to the event will be published in a CD that will be delivered free of charge to registered delegates. Contributions are limited to a maximum length of 15 pages (letter size, 216 x 279 mm), in 12-point Arial font, 1.5 line spacing, with bibliography, graphics, and tables included, and submitted in Word. Those who wish to publish their full presentations should send them by email to: anthroposmontane2020@gmail.com.

Submission deadline: November 12, 2019

Conference Fees

Foreign participants: 250 Cuban convertible pesos (CUC). Undergraduate students: 175 CUC (limited to those who provide official certification of their status from their educational institution). Non-presenting guests: 100 CUC. The Havana Convention Center offers the possibility of paying the registration fee online.

Contact Information

Please contact pagosonlinepalacio1@palco.cu or pagosonlinepalacio2@palco.cu and submit this information: 1. Name and dates of the event: Anthropos 2020, March 9-12, 2020. 2. Your personal information: Name and last name, country of residence, email address. 3. Indicate if you are a participant, a student, or a non-presenting companion. You will receive a response email with a link to a secure site where you will be able to pay the registration fee with a credit card or a bank transfer. If paying through a bank transfer, please provide the name of the bank account owner.

ANTHROPOS 2020 is convened by the Montané Anthropological Museum, the “Luis Montané” Chair of Anthropology at the University of Havana, the Cuban Society for Biological Anthropology, and the “Eopithecus” Primate Studies Society of Mexico. It is also co-sponsored by the Latin American Association of Biological Anthropology, the Cuban Institute of Anthropology, the Fernando Ortiz Foundation, and the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association.

ADTSG 2019 Graduate Student Paper Prize

The Alcohol, Drug, and Tobacco Study Group (ADTSG) of the Society for Medical Anthropology invites submissions for the best graduate student paper in the anthropology of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, or other psychoactive substance use. A committee of ADTSG members will judge qualifying submissions.  The author of the winning paper will receive a cash award of $100, and her or his name will be announced at the Society for Medical Anthropology awards ceremony at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in November 2019.  Submissions from all anthropological sub-disciplines are encouraged.

QUALIFYING CRITERIA

  • No more than 9,000 words (including references and notes)
  • Must be based on original fieldwork and data
  • Must have been written in the past 12 months
  • Primary or first author must be a graduate student at time of submission
  • May be unpublished or submitted for publication at the time of submission

JUDGING CRITERIA

  • Originality of fieldwork and data
  • Richness of substantive or evidentiary materials
  • Clarity of anthropological methods
  • Linkage of work to social science literature
  • Effective use of theory and data
  • Organization, quality of writing, and coherence of argument

SUBMISSION PROCESS

  • Please do not include your name or any identifying information in the paper itself.
  • Papers must be double spaced and in PDF format (please include page numbers).
  • References and in-text citations should be formatted according to Chicago Manual of Style.
  • Please submit via email to Shana Harris, Chair of ADTSG, at shana.harris@ucf.edu
  • Submissions must be received by 5:00PM EST on August 1, 2019, for full consideration.

Questions may be directed to Shana Harris at the above email address. We look forward to your submissions!